Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Sweet summer dreams to us all:-)

Sunday, May 10, 2015

Happy Mother's Day!

How are you honoring the divine feminine today?

I enjoyed massaging mom's at my son Emmet's ultimate tournament.



Saturday, April 11, 2015

Spring again and time to renew, reuse and recycle!

What can you cleanse from your life and perhaps give new life to?

Many times I have heard the wisdom of treating objects and things as if they are people with souls.

Is something in your home having the honorable placement it deserves? If not, consider gifting it a new home, or finding it a more honorable place or storage until it can be restored.

Fengshui Shui your space into serenity,


Friday, March 21, 2014

Happy Spring...


Consider letting go of something to make room for the new glorious season.  An item, an attitude, an old thought pattern.

A great way to cleanse is with tea tree!  It's clean, green and fresh!

In a pinch it will clean almost anything;-)



Monday, June 10, 2013


Benefits of saffron

(medicinal properties of saffron)
Saffron has been known since Antiquity as a remedy for all pains, without claiming to be a universal medicine, it is however a natural solution for many health problems in our times.

In the East, saffron was generally used to treat light to moderate depression; it had the reputation to bring cheerfulness and wisdom. Because of this, it is said that it has aphrodisiac properties for women.

In Morocco, saffron is part of a remedy passed down from mother to daughter still used to relieve tooth ache when babies get their first teeth (for external use: analgesic for gums), by massaging gums with a gold ring coated with honey and saffron, a lotion with natural antiseptic properties. In France, the well known Delabarresyrup took up the same recipe. Grand-mothers also relieved young women's painful periods by giving them tea or milk with saffron.

This spice has been well known for a very long time as a remedy against many ailments. It is among the richest plant sources of riboflavin (vitamin B2). It also contains an essential oil, safranal, and some crocetins which are carotenoids, that is to say pro-vitamin A.

Whereas pigments play a stimulating function in digestion (using from 0.5 to 1 g per litre of water, saffron stimulates digestion), safranal has a sedative action. In general, saffron is known to act on the nervous system: it would be both analgesic and tonic.

In traditional medicine, the plant is used as a stomachic. In Chinese medicine, it is employed as a painkiller for cramps and asthma and can also treat bruises.

It allows heart rate to slow down as well as lowering blood pressure and even stimulate respiration.    It is said to ease digestion, relieve the liver and also thin the blood.

At very high doses, saffron can be dangerous (>10 g), which would be an exceptional case as the usual proportion is from 0.01g to 0.02 g per person.  

Try it:

In hot drinks: crocus sativus soothes coughs and relieves colds. The right dose for hot drinks is: from 0.5 g to 1 g per litre of water.
In massages: it relieves from pain, in particular in gums. It is used as a pure powder or diluted with honey to apply directly in the mouth or mixed with some glycerin to relax tense body areas.
In broths: it stimulates digestion (the right dose: 1g per liter)
In pills: laboratories use an extract from the top part of the pistil having effect on neurotransmitters as a natural antidepressant. Where can you find it? In its natural form (threads or powder) from the producers.  

Saffron is a powerful dye too

Saffron's dyeing power is still used to give the golden yellow colour to cloth used for special purposes like Buddhist robes, the bride's veil in some countries of Maghreb, and above all in carpets as it is said to act as a moth repellent.

The famous Venetian blond of Italian renaissance women was obtained by coating their hair with a mixture of saffron and lemon, then staying out in the sun.  

Monday, May 21, 2012

Lovely Lavender is just that, Lovely!

I am re-posting on this plant because it is just that lovely:

Lavender, also known as Lavandula angustifolia, is one of the most widely used, versatile herbs known today. It is considered a member of the Labiatae family, which also includes mints and the plant originated in England, France, Tasmania, and Yugoslavia.
Lavender flowers have long since been used to treat digestive problems, insomnia, anxiety, and restlessness. Until World War I, lavender was used to treat and disinfect wounds. For centuries, English farmers would place lavender flowers in their hats to prevent headache and sunstroke. Women would place sachets of lavender in their closets and wardrobes for fragrance, in addition to using it in potpourri. Hospitals used lavender as an antiseptic and disinfectant to sterilize surfaces and equipment.
Today, lavender is used in much of the same way, for many of the same reasons. Both the flowers of the plant and the essential oils derived from the plant can be used for therapeutic uses.
According to the book The New Healing Herbs, the essential oils extracted from the flowers contain more than 150 compounds. Lavender essential oil is easily and quickly absorbed into the skin, and can be detected in the blood in as little as 5 minutes.
Today, lavender is most commonly used for anxiety, depression, mental exhaustion, insomnia, scrapes and wounds, digestive problems, headaches, skin problems and women's health problems. In addition to this, lavender can be used to treat exhaustion, heat exposure, fevers, aches and pains, over-exertion, jet lag, rashes, sprains, sunburn, sunstroke, bruises and burns. It can also be used as a disinfectant and insect repellant. Lavender is an antiseptic, natural antibiotic, sedative, detoxifier.
Anxiety and depression. The essential oil of lavender has a calming, sedative, and anti-convulsive effect. It can also increase the effectiveness of other relaxants.
According to the Smell and Taste Foundation in Chicago, the scent of lavender increases brain waves associated with relaxation.
Commission E, the German counterpart of the FDA that regulates herbal remedies, also approves lavender for treating relaxation and restlessness.
Insomnia. A study conducted at the University of Leicester in England showed that the use of lavender essential oil is just as effective in promoting sound sleep as traditional medication. In fact, many British hospitals offer their patients lavender pillows to help with sleeplessness.
Scrapes and wounds. Lavender essential oil has very powerful antiseptic properties. Applying it to wounds can not only increase cell growth causing the wound to heal faster, but it also decreases the appearance of scars. The oils anti-microbial action protects scrapes and wounds from infection, while allowing them heal.
Digestive problems. Lavender has also been endorsed by Germany's Commission E to treat all sorts of stomach and digestive disorders. It soothes the lining of the digestive tract and promotes the secretion of bile, which helps the body digest fats. In addition to this, lavender can also relieve gas pressure and constipation.
Headaches. Massaging lavender oil onto the temples, neck and forehead can relieve neck and head tension and promote relaxation, thus relieving a variety of headaches. Those included are general headaches, gastric headaches, nervous headaches, sinus and tension headaches.
Skin problems. By massaging lavender oil into the skin, it can be used to treat a number of skin problems such as acne, burns, dry skin, eczema, itchy skin, sunburn, seborrhea, and skin inflammation.
Women's health problems. For pregnancy, lavender can help sooth and relieve flatulence and indigestion. It can diminish the look of stretch marks and scars. It can relieve cramps, edema, exhaustion, infection, breast abscesses, and post-natal depression. A study of lavender by British researchers suggests that using lavender oil during pregnancy and childbirth can help ease delivery pain and promote a speedy recovery.
By either adding lavender to the bath or massaging it into the skin, lavender can help relieve pre-menstrual syndrome, and menstrual cramps. It is effective in aiding the treatment of chlamydia, pelvic inflammatory disease, thrush, vaginal infections, inflamed vaginal tissue, vaginitis, cystitis, Raynaud's Disease, breast abscesses, and cervical cancer. If being treated with radiation for any form of cervical or uterine cancer, lavender oil can prevent and diminish irradiation burns.
The uses of lavender are endless. Lavender is a must-have for all homes because of its calming, antibiotic, antiseptic, disinfectant, antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties. It is good for treating or aiding in the treatment of a number of health problems.
By mixing lavender with water, it can be sprayed on surfaces and used as a household disinfectant, and applying it to the skin can deter insects.
According to the book The New Healing Herbs, the Journal of the National Cancer Institute believes that a particular compound in lavender, known as perillyl alcohol has been shown to exert remarkable action against a variety of cancer tumors in the breast, lung, liver, colon and pancreas. It is noted that currently, this particular compound is being tested as a possible cancer preventative, as well as treatment.
Applications and safety.
Lavender can be applied a number of different ways. It can be massaged onto the skin, placed in diffusers for inhalation, added to baths, added to vaporizers, and mixed with water or other substances for spray purposes.
Lavender is very potent and should always be used sparingly. The oil must always be diluted with water or a carrier oil such as olive, jojoba, avocado, or grape seed oil. Never place lavender oil directly on the skin without diluting it. Lavender flowers can be placed in sachets, potpourri, heat packs, ice packs and wraps. Lavender is safe for most anyone. The flowers remain effective long after they have dried.
To store lavender, both the oil and flowers should be placed in a dark, glass container, away from direct sunlight or heat.
Lavender is an extremely useful, beneficial and versitale herb. It can be used to therapeutically treat a variety of ailments, contains antibiotic, antiseptic, disinfectant, antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties, is safe for most all adults, has a pleasant aroma and calming qualities. Lavender is truly a must for every home and should become an excellent addition to the first aid kit.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Benefits of Tea Tree Essential oil in Castile soap!

Tea Tree is purifying with a medicinal aroma, it is quite effective as an antimicrobial.



Tea tree oil has been scientifically investigated only recently. Some sources suggest beneficial medical properties when applied topically, including antiviral,[7] antibacterial, antifungal, and antiseptic qualities. It also has beneficial cosmetic properties.[8]

Tea tree oil is active against Staphylococcus aureus, including MRSA.[9] Tea tree oil is less successful for application in the nose.[10] Also, there is clinical evidence that topical dermatological preparations containing tea tree oil may be more effective than conventional antibiotics in preventing transmission of CA-MRSA.[11]

Recent studies support a role for the topical application of tea tree oil in skin care and for the treatment of various diseases and conditions. Tea tree oil appears to be effective against bacteria, viruses, fungal infections, mites such as scabies, and lice such as head lice. A 2008 study of in vitro toxicity showed a tea tree oil preparation was more effective against head lice than permethrin, a popular pharmaceutical remedy.[12]

In the treatment of moderate common acne, topical application of 5% tea tree oil has shown an effect comparable to 5% benzoyl peroxide. Albeit with slower onset of action, patients who use tea tree oil experience fewer side effects than those that use benzoyl peroxide treatments. [13]

Tea tree oil is a known antifungal agent, effective in vitro against multiple dermatophytes found on the skin.[14] In vivo, shampoo with 5% tea tree oil has been shown to be an effective treatment for dandruff due to its ability to treat Malassezia furfur, the most common cause of the condition.[15]

One clinical study found that 100% tea tree oil administered topically, combined with debridement, was comparable to clotrimazole in effectiveness against onychomycosis, the most frequent cause of nail disease.[16]

The effectiveness of topical tea tree oil preparations for the treatment of the yeast infection Candidiasis is supported by its ability to kill Candida in vitro.[17]

There is some very limited research that has shown that tea tree oil may have topical antiviral activity, especially against the herpes virus (cold sores), chicken pox, shingles blisters, etc.[18]

One study has shown a 5% tea tree oil solution to be more effective than commercial medications against the scabies mite in an in vitro situation.[19]' -